Posts tagged ‘Sanitation’

March 11, 2014

Zambia to Hold First African Water Integrity Summit

Wallace Mawire
March 11, 2014

Zambia will on April 29 to 30, 2014 host the first African water integrity summit.The summit “Accelerating towards a Water Secure World” takes place in Lusaka, Zambia.

Hosted by UNDP-Water Governance Facility, The Water Integrity Network, UNDP/Cap-Net, WaterNet and the Stockholm International Water Institute, the summit marks the conclusion of a successful three-year regional integrity training programme in Sub-Saharan Africa.

SIWI Logo

SIWI Logo

The programme successfully trained more than 400 stakeholders across 36 countries, the impact of which will be documented and analyzed at the summit, in order to further disseminate practical insights on how to respond to misconduct in the water sector.

Gathering water sector stakeholders from Western, Southern and Eastern Africa to exchange knowledge and experiences, the conference aims to encourage and stimulate dialogue on learning how corruption can be addressed in the water sector at a regional and national level.

Most African countries struggle to provide access to water and sanitation to their people

Most African countries struggle to provide access to water and sanitation to their people

The purpose of the summit is to share know-how, experiences, successful tools and challenges when implementing water integrity action plans. It will contribute to building political ownership for water integrity practice, assess the gaps and develop a way forward for further enhancing integrity in the water sector.

July 20, 2013

Ivory Coast: Plans for Holding the 2013 High-Level Forum on Water and Sanitation for All Underway

WaterSan Perspective Reporter
July 20, 2013

Up to 800 participants are expected in Abidjan from 21 to 23 November 2013 for the 2013 High-Level Forum on Water and Sanitation for All

“To promote vibrant and effective South-South cooperation to accelerate access to hygiene, sanitation, and drinking water for all in Africa,” is the theme of the Forum.

Originally set up by the Pan-African Intergovernmental Agency for Water and Sanitation for Africa (WSA) (http://www.wsafrica.org), this year’s forum is being organised in association with the Government of Ivory Coast.

Water and Sanitation for Africa Logo

Water and Sanitation for Africa Logo

This is the third forum; the first two were held in Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso and Dakar in Senegal. Its objective is to provide a platform for various decision-makers and stakeholders involved in this sector in Africa to exchange information and exert their influence, thus encouraging decisions and concrete action in support of WASH in Africa.

The 2013 Forum has three main objectives: (i) to find the best way to take advantage of South-South partnerships for the development of business opportunities in terms of financial cooperation for the implementation of priority projects beyond the reach of national budgets in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene sector (WASH); (ii) to develop strategic alliances and partnerships to strengthen the technical and institutional capacities of southern countries in the WASH sector; (iii) to stimulate the sharing of experiences and know-how between southern countries in the WASH sector.

The third High-Level Forum on Water and Sanitation for All in Africa is of interest to all stakeholders and senior officials in the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene sector in Africa. They include African heads of state, ministers responsible for water and sanitation issues in Africa, African finance ministers, as well as technical and financial partners from the North and South, mainly consisting of export-import banks, researchers, investors, NGOs, and integration and development organisations.

The institution, which has 32 member countries, has been working in Africa for 25 years to develop solutions to address the problems of water and sanitation on the continent. Its mission is based on the establishment of integrated systems combining the optimization of technical and scientific approaches with innovative funding mechanisms.

2013 is International Year of Water Cooperation

2013 is International Year of Water Cooperation

March 22, 2013

Governments Can Make Water and Sanitation for All Africans a Reality by 2030 says WaterAid

WaterSan Perspective
March 22, 2013

WaterAid –an international charity that transforms lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation is calling on international leaders to support an ambitious target of providing access to water, sanitation and hygiene for all Africans by 2030.

The agency’s call comes today March, 22 on the 20th anniversary of World Water Day as over 50,000 people take part in more than 30 mass walking events across Africa to call on their governments to keep their promises on access to clean water and safe sanitation.

WaterAid logo

WaterAid logo

They are joining more than 350,000 people worldwide who are participating in World Walks for Water and Sanitation between Saturday 16 and Saturday 23 March.

Writing in a new report published by WaterAid today, President Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia said:
“Addressing the global water and sanitation crisis is not about charity, but opportunity. According to the World Health Organisation, every $1 invested in water and sanitation produces an average of $4 in increased productivity. It enables sustainable and equitable economic growth. In short, it will not be possible to make progress in eradicating poverty, reducing inequality and securing sustainable economic development in the future without improving access.”

WaterAid’s report ‘Everyone Everywhere’ launched today by President Johnson Sirleaf at a UN event on water in the Hague, in the Netherlands, sets out a vision for making safe water and sanitation available to all and reviews the progress that has been made to date in tackling water and sanitation poverty.

The report finds that, lack of progress in improving access to water, sanitation and hygiene is acting as a brake on progress in economic and human development particularly in child health, nutrition and education.

Pupils collecting water in Uganda. In every society, water , health and education are closely inter-related

Pupils collecting water in Uganda. In every society, water , health and education are closely inter-related

WaterAid cites World Health Organisation figures that show the economic gains that Africa could make through everyone on the continent having access to water and sanitation.

Africa could gain $33 billion every year from everyone having access to water and sanitation. Of this $4.5 billion would come from reduced healthcare costs; $7.2 billion could be gained from reduced mortality; $2 billion from less time taken off from work; and a staggering $19.5 billion in general time saved.

The benefits for Africa in lives saved from everyone having access to water and sanitation on the continent are also significant. It is estimated by the Institute of Health Metrics that around 550,000 people die of diarrhoea diseases every year in Sub-Saharan Africa(3), 88% of whom, according to the World Health Organisation, can be attributed to a lack of water, sanitation and hygiene(4) that equates to 480,000 deaths due to a lack of these services on the continent.

Nelson Gomonda, WaterAid Pan-Africa Programme Manager said: “Nothing could better demonstrate that our continent has truly begun to realise its potential and is coming true on its promise of progress and development, than achieving the fundamental goal of every African having safe drinking water.”

“330 million Africans today live without access to clean water, so the road to travel is long, but we can for the first time see the end in sight. With more than 1,000 African children under the age of five dying every day from diseases brought about from a lack of water and sanitation, Africans will not accept failure. We have to reach this target.”

“More than 50,000 Africans are taking part in walks to show that that these services are a priority that we want and need. Africans understand how a lack of water and sanitation affects their health, economic productivity, their children’s education, women’s rights – across every spectrum of development, water and sanitation plays its part. This is why progress on these basic services will have such important consequences for our continent and people.”

wwfwas logo 2013

wwfwas logo 2013

Currently in Sub-Sahara Africa, 334 million people (39% of the population) lack access to clean drinking water, while under 600 million (70%) lack access to sanitation(5).

To tackle this problem now, WaterAid is calling on international leaders to: Recognise the need for the framework that replaces the Millennium Development Goals in 2015 to reflect the contribution of water, sanitation and hygiene to other areas of poverty reduction, including health, education, gender equality, economic growth and sustainability; for the UN to set a new global target to achieve universal access to water, sanitation and hygiene by 2030; Identify ways of accelerating future rates of progress on sanitation if the goal of universal access is to be met by 2030.

2013 is International Year of Water Cooperation

2013 is International Year of Water Cooperation

February 24, 2013

Uganda: AWF Offers a $1m Grant To Promotion of Sanitation

Patrick Kabatereine
February 24, 2013

The African Water Facility offered a 1 million euro grant to efforts dedicated to providing affordable and sustainable sanitation services to over 100,000 urban poor living in Kawempe Municipality, in Kampala, Uganda.

The funds go to the Community Integrated Development Initiatives (CIDI) to support their Kawempe Urban Poor Sanitation Improvement Project (KUPSIP)

By expanding sanitation coverage and reducing environmental pollution, the KUPSIP is expected to help improve the health of slum dwellers and decrease the mortality rate of children under five. In particular, this will be achieved by reducing the spread of cholera and diarrheal diseases, which is 23 per cent higher in households where facilities are inadequate and in areas where human waste disposal is improperly managed.

A latrine in rural Uganda.  The world remains behind in providing universal access to safe and hygienic toilets.

A latrine in rural Uganda. The world remains behind in providing universal access to safe and hygienic toilets.

More specifically, the grant will support provision of sanitation facilities for households, schools and the public in poor urban areas; delivery of pro-poor sanitation financing for accessing affordable and improved sanitation infrastructure; definition of a sustainable fecal sludge management and safe reuse strategy and promoting of collaboration with the private sector to identify and market affordable and consumer-friendly sanitation technologies.

Others are dissemination of targeted information, education and communication to promote better hygiene practices and generation and dissemination of knowledge products covering the entire sanitation chain through collaboration with agronomical research institutions.

The AWF grant will cover 74 per cent of the total project cost, while CIDI and collaborating partners will meet the balance of 26 per cent in form of financial and in-kind contributions.

Poor Sanitation and hygiene remains one of dangerous threats to good health in most Africa’s towns

Poor Sanitation and hygiene remains one of dangerous threats to good health in most Africa’s towns

The project will be executed by CIDI in partnership with Kawempe Municipality of the Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) and the National Water and Sewerage Cooperation (NWSC) and should be completed by the end of 2015.

November 19, 2012

Countries Mark World Toilet Day

World Toilet Organization and
Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council
November 19th, 2012

Today is World Toilet Day, a day set aside not simply as a celebration, but as a way to highlight the plight of 2.5 billion people without access to a clean, private toilet.

“I give a shit, do you?” is theme of global awareness campaign.

World Toilet Day logo

19 November 2012 Geneva/Singapore: “I give a shit, do you?” is the plea of the 2012 global World Toilet Day campaign put together by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and the World Toilet Organization (WTO).

Observed annually on 19 November, World Toilet Day (WTD) aims to break the taboo around toilets and to raise global awareness of the daily struggle for proper dignified sanitation that a staggering 2.5 billion people continue to face.

“World Toilet Day aims to draw attention about the major impact the humble toilet has on our lives.

Access to a clean, private toilet equals health, dignity, freedom and safety” says Chris Williams, Executive Director of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council, a Geneva-based, United Nations hosted organization that is championing the issue. “In addition, sanitation can also be looked at as a motor for economic development. Studies show that each dollar invested in sanitation generates five dollars in return. For countries, and individuals, sanitation is one of the best investments to be made” he concludes.

The sanitation crisis is not only an affront to dignity. Hundreds of tons of feces and urine plunge each day directly into rivers, creating a human and environmental health hazard. Every twenty seconds a child dies from sanitation-related illness.

“What we don’t discuss, we can’t improve” says Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization. “Over the last 12 years World Toilet Day has become an amazing groundswell movement for everyone to support better toilets and sanitation conditions around the world. World Toilet Day has also become a day of creativity as people all over the globe celebrate it in their own style” he adds.

Designed as an online campaign, www.worldtoiletday.org, World Toilet Day wants to cast its net far and wide to get the attention of not just those working on these issues already, but also decision makers and the public.

A latrine in rural Uganda. The world remains behind in providing universal access to safe and hygienic toilets.

Campaigners have taken World Toilet Day to new heights – today, get involved with:
• The “World’s Longest Squat” will take place in Bettiah, Bihar, India, the culminating site off the 50-day long Nirmal Bharat Great WASH Yatra. Yatra attendees and staff will squat, like those 1.2 billion people around the world who open defecate every day because they lack a clean, private toilet, and see who can squat the longest with observers cheering on www.nirmalbharatyatra.org

• Ghana WASH Project and join route marches and dramas by school pupils http://www.ghanawashproject.org

• “Big Squats” at the University of Iowa chapter of Engineers Without Borders (USA) and at Queens University Belfast (Northern Ireland)

• SochinAction – Be the Change Exposition in Singapore (Malaysia), the world’s largest social movement by children. They are encouraged to design and innovate on to make positive changes in the world they live in crisis. http://sochinaction.com

• The Public Toilet – Domestos, in collaboration with the artists’ collective Greyworld, is supporting WTD by erecting a digital squatting sculpture in Potters Field, London (UK). You can have your face digitally uploaded on the sculpture by recording a short video or a photo of yourself at www.thepublictoilet.com

• Toilet Hackers will be celebrating World Toilet Day in New York City (USA) with a benefit reading of An Inconvenient Poop. Written by Shawn Shafner and Croft Vaughn, and directed by Scott Nogi, this reading features a talented cast with multimedia and music. All proceeds will go to Toilet Hackers’ sanitation program in Samburu, Kenya. http://callofdoodie.eventbrite.com/

• The Keep Your Promises campaign, led by End Water Poverty (EWP), launches a petition calling on governments to keep their promises on sanitation and water www.keepyourpromises.org

• The DefeatDD campaign invites you to make your sanitation wish and share it on Twitter and Facebook: http://www.defeatdd.org/take-action/world-toilet-day

October 16, 2012

New Global World Toilet Day campaign is launched – Do you Give A Shit?

Water, Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC)
WaterSan Perspective
October 16, 2012

Do you Give A Shit? This is the tagline of the new global World Toilet Day campaign put together by the Water, Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and the World Toilet Organization (WTO). It’s slightly controversial. Very straight talking and means serious business.

Observed annually on 19 November, World Toilet Day is one of international of action that aims to break the taboo around the toilets – a topic no one likes to talk about – and draw attention to the existing global sanitation challenge.

The campaign’s e-notification

World Toilet Day was created to raise global awareness of the daily for proper dignified sanitation that a staggering 2.5 billion people continue to face.

Originally promoted by the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene sector (WASH) sector who understood far earlier the benefits of proper sanitation, good hygiene and clean drinking water has on the health and wellbeing, educational attainment, wealth not to mention just basic human dignity. Increasingly it is gaining recognition by the international development community as a key issue, but there is still a long way to go.

World Toilet Day Logo

Designed as an online campaign, World Toilet Day wants to cast its net far and wide to get the attention of not just those working on these issues already, but also decision makers and the public. Through its recently launched website (hyperlink website) it gives those interested in advocating for safer toilets– the perfect opportunity to do so. Through the website you can:
• Share the key campaign messages
• Advocate for better sanitation by hosting an event and register your activities on the interactive World Toilet Day map
• Promote World Toilet Day by using the logo, posters, banners, stickers and brochure
• Tell the world why You Give A Shit!
• Help the word on Facebook and Twitter.
• If you Give A Shit, then World Toilet Day invites you to join in, take action and spread the word.

You can get more information at: www.worldtoiletday.org

September 25, 2012

SADC Launches a 2-Million Euro Regional Water Supply and Sanitation Programme

Newton Sibanda in South Africa
September 25, 2012

The Southern African Development Community (SADC) has launched a 2 million Euro Regional Water Supply and Sanitation Programme (RWSSP) that aims to assist member states to fast track their improvements towards increasing access to water supply and sanitation.

The programme which was launched in Johannesburg on Monday (September 24) aims to enhance regional attainment of the millennium development goal (MDG) on water and sanitation, and support the development of post 2015 Water, Sanitation, Hygiene (WASH) goals towards a sustainable future.

The 22-month programme which is funded by the African Development Bank (AfDB) through the Africa Water Facility, with a contribution from the SADC Secretariat will develop regional frameworks, tools, and methodologies to assist member states to improve the provision of safe water supply and sanitation (WSS), contributing toward socio-economic growth, poverty reduction, and regional integration.

Speaking at the launch ceremony, Senior Programme Officer for Water at the SADC Secretariat Phera Ramoeli said the RWSSP was a response to one of SADC’s targets towards reducing by half, the number of people with no access to water and sanitation by 2015.

Senior Programme Officer for Water at the SADC Secretariat Phera Ramoeli

The RWSSP is an integral component of SADC’s Regional Water Policy and the current Regional Strategic Action Plan (RSAP) on Integrated Water Resources Development and Management which runs from 2011 to 2015.

The launch was attended by over 60 delegates from ministries responsible for water, sanitation, housing, finance and planning in the SADC member states, the Africa Ministers Council on Water (AMCOW), African Union Commission (AUC) and the global Joint Monitoring Programme for Water and Sanitation.

Chief Water Policy Officer from the African Water Facility of the AfDB, Peter Akari urged SADC member states to promote infrastructure development that incorporates climate change adaptation in their interventions towards increased access to water and sanitation.

An AMCOW representative Anselme Vodunehessi commended SADC for developing regional instruments for coordinated management of water resources and urged the regional organisation to translate the frameworks into deliverables that improve the lives of people and feed into the development of the Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) post 2015 WASH goals.

“We need to strengthen our monitoring and evaluation systems to ensure that the frameworks and policies we develop result in meeting our water and sanitation goals”, Mr Vodunehessi said.

The SADC RWSSP focuses on five components which have been identified during numerous stakeholder consultations since 1998 and have led to the timely development and launch of this Programme.

The five programme components include strengthening financing strategies and tools; institutional rationalisation; infrastructure development support; monitoring and reporting; and knowledge management and advocacy.

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