Posted inWater Journalists Africa

Tana River Bears the Cost of Development

Geoffrey KamadiFirst Published by Science Africa January 15, 2020 It could easily pass for anybody’s idea of paradise on earth. The lush vegetation lining River Tana’s banks is so luxurious, that movement is made near-impossible at certain sections of the river channel. No two mdau boats (dug-out canoes made usually from the almond tree (Terminalia catappa) trunk […]

Posted inClimate Change

Trapped in the Buffer Zone: Ugandan communities forgotten in the fight against climate change

By Annika McGinnis January 15, 2020 On the shores of Lake Victoria, southeastern Uganda, a Norwegian timber plantation sells carbon credits on the international carbon market as part of the global effort to fight climate change. Climate finance was designed to bring money and development to the local communities that host such major tree-growing projects. […]

Posted inClimate Change

Mt. Elgon Landslides Survivors Plant 30,000 Trees through a Village Savings Group to Fight Climate Change

By: Javier Silas Omagor December 11, 2019 Five years ago when Musa Mandu told his wife and relatives that he was going to quit his local government job to fight against climate change in Manafwa district, they were extremely upset. “They didn’t understand what that meant. They never thought this would sustain me and my […]

Posted inWater Journalists Africa

Fighting for the conservation of even the less-charismatic species

Michelle Rotchford Galloway September 09, 2019 “Tourists don’t pay to see a crab,” said Tatenda Dalu of the Department of Ecology and Resource Management at the University of Venda. He says charismatic animals – like the big five – tend to receive the focus of conservation activities due to the tourist dollars they attract but […]

Posted inWater Journalists Africa

Malawi President Mutharika commissions six marine warships

George Mhango, Blantyre in Malawi Malawi has commissioned six marine warships meant to protect the citizens from enemies who will invade Lake Malawi. The warships will also provide rescue efforts to users of the lake, including tourists who flock to the lake. The warships are named after incumbent president Peter Mutharika, former president Bakili Muluzi […]

Posted inWater Cooperation And Diplomacy

Boreholes Key to Drought Resilience in Ethiopia, Study Shows

Sarah McDaid August 23, 2019 Installing more boreholes to tap underground water will improve rural Ethiopian communities’ resilience to drought, according to a new report.  Research carried out by the British Geological Survey (BGS), the University of Addis Ababa and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) showed that people who have access to groundwater from boreholes […]

Posted inWater Journalists Africa

Road River: A photo story of a river dried by illegal land acquisitions

Fredrick Mugira and Annika McGinnis August 20,2019 This reporting project was made possible through the generous support of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Data visualisations by Code for Africa A lifeline river for over five million people in southwestern Uganda has been turned into a road. Rwizi River has had up to 80 percent […]

Posted inWater Resources

How Egypt’s water feeds the Gulf

Writers: Nada Arafat and Saker El Nour Coordination: Fredrick Mugira May 2019 This story was produced in partnership with InfoNile and Code for Africa with support from the Pulitzer Center. Vast expanses of green extend across the horizon, tended by the advanced machinery that has replaced hundreds of agricultural workers. The land is watered using center-pivot irrigation systems, […]

Posted inWater Resources

Land Grabbing and Its Implications for Sudanese – Views from a scholar

This story was produced in partnership with InfoNile and Code for Africa with support from the Pulitzer Center. Annika McGinnis and Fredrick Mugira May 13, 2019 Investors from largely food-insecure Gulf countries are increasingly buying vast swaths of fertile land irrigated by the Nile River in Sudan to grow food crops to sustain their populations. […]