By Annika McGinnis January 15, 2020

On the shores of Lake Victoria, southeastern Uganda, a Norwegian timber plantation sells carbon credits on the international carbon market as part of the global effort to fight climate change. Climate finance was designed to bring money and development to the local communities that host such major tree-growing projects. But in the case of Bukaleba Forest Reserve, four communities that have lived on the land for generations are struggling to survive.

This InfoNile.org story by Annika McGinnis was supported with funding from the Pulitzer Center and IHE Delft Global Partnership for Water and Development.

Water Journalists Africa

Legitimately registered in Uganda, Water Journalists Africa was established in 2011 in Cape Town, South Africa with support from the UN-Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication.

Water Journalists Africa has since 2011, partnered with various international and Africa based organizations such as the UN-Water, The Water Channel, Water Integrity Network, 2030 Water Resources Group and UNESCO-IHE among several others to enhance reporting on Integrated Water Resources Management in Africa and promote interaction among African Journalists who report on water.

Some 700 journalists from 50 African countries to date are members of this network making it certainly the largest media network on the continent.

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